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MANUEL MÉRIDA
INSTALLATION NUANCIER

Manuel Mérida is one of the major figures in the second generation of South American kinetic artists. Through his work, he seeks to avoid offering a still and unique vision, playing with the variations of colored matter such as pigments, sand, coal powder, wood particles, painted wood or painted metal which sublimate his monochromes. The works are constantly mobile and realized in various shapes, sizes and colors. The square or circular cases are filled with matter protected by a glass plate and rotating around a central axis. They spin abruptly through the hand of the spectator while the most recent ones activated by an engine, turn at a much slower pace.

"Unlike Soto or Cruz-Diez, Mérida was not interested in the process of dematerialization nor in optical illusion based on the interaction of light and vibrations; he was rather keen on working with concrete and tangible elements and above all, wanted to underscore their materiality. In this context, his works in advertising and as a scenographer revealed themselves being important investments since they provided the artist with a full new set of technical and practical skills, a deep knowledge of materials, mechanics and, most importantly, a well-rooted sense of space and architecture that was actually the precursor’s element in Mérida’s big scale installations and which remained consistent in his work, up until today." - Valentina Locatelli

Merida has received multiple international awards with his works exhibited all over the world, making headlines in different media outlets and leading to interviews in some TV shows. The Parisian brand Hermès collaborated with Manuel Mérida to create stunning circles of different colors for all of the brand’s windows in Paris, New York, Geneva, Cannes, Shanghai and other major cities and likewise were acquired by the Cheval Blanc hotels of Louis Vuitton in Saint Barthelemy and in the Maldives where they are currently displayed.

Madison W1 Merida July 2012.tiff

Hermes's window, New York, USA, 2012. Photo : Skot Yobbagy

Video by François Castelot

Video by François Castelot

Video by François Castelot

Video by François Castelot

Video by François Castelot

Video by François Castelot